EGAN MAUSOLEUM

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The Egan Mausoleum is a stone-built mausoleum of simple structure that dates back to the mid-eighteenth century. The mausoleum is located in Clonberne Cemetery, a small graveyard that also contains the remarkable cast-iron Dennis Mausoleum, erected in the nineteenth century by Elizabeth Dennis for her husband and his brother.

The Egan Mausoleum is a rectangular building with a gabled roof, now collapsed and overgrown with vegetation. The walls are made of rubble limestone, with squared quoins and a string course below the top of the walls. The entrance is on the east side, with a large stone door-case that features a round-headed arch with voussoirs and a keystone. Above the door, there is an inscription in Latin that reads:

“HIC JACET CORPUS JOANNIS EGAN DE CLONBERN ARMIGERI QUI OBIIT 18 DIE NOVEMBRIS ANNO DOMINI 1762 ETATIS SUAE”

This translates as:

“Here lies the body of John Egan of Clonberne, Esquire, who died on the 18th day of November in the year of our Lord 1762, aged 62”

The inscription is carved in a folk art style, with some letters inverted or misplaced. The door is also decorated with a carved skull and crossbones, a common symbol of mortality in the eighteenth century. The interior of the mausoleum is not accessible to the public, but it is likely that it contains some burial vaults or niches for the Egan family.

The Egan Mausoleum is a testament to the wealth and status of the Egan family, who were prominent landowners and merchants in Clonberne and Galway. John Egan was the son of Thomas Egan and Mary Lynch, and he married Mary Burke of Kilcolgan. He had several children, including Thomas Egan, who was a member of the Irish Parliament for Tuam from 1761 to 1768, and John Egan, who was a barrister and judge.

The Egan Mausoleum is one of the few surviving examples of stone-built mausolea in Ireland, and it reflects the influence of classical architecture and funerary monuments on the Georgian elite. It also contrasts with the more elaborate and ornate Dennis Mausoleum, which represents the Victorian taste for cast-iron structures and Gothic revival motifs. Both mausolea are worth visiting for their historical and architectural significance, as well as their scenic setting in Clonberne Cemetery.

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53.556867, -8.656256

Egan Mausoleum

GALLERY

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