DOVECOTE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GALWAY

0.0
Rated 0.0 out of 5

If you are looking for a unique and fascinating place to visit in Galway, you might want to check out the dovecote on the grounds of the University of Galway (NUIG). A dovecote is a structure that was designed to house pigeons or doves, which were valued for their meat, eggs, feathers and fertilizer. Dovecotes were common in Europe from the medieval times to the 18th century, but many of them have been demolished or neglected over time.

The dovecote at the University of Galway is one of the few surviving examples of this type of building in Ireland. It dates back to the 19th century and was part of the Belmont House Estate, which was owned by the Martin family, one of the so-called “Tribes of Galway”. The estate was acquired by the university in 1912 and became part of its campus.

The dovecote is a circular stone structure with a conical slate roof. It has two levels, each with rows of small openings or niches that served as nesting places for the birds. The interior of the dovecote is accessed by a wooden ladder that leads to a wooden platform. The platform has a central hole that allows access to the upper level. The dovecote can accommodate up to 600 pigeons or doves.

The dovecote is not only a historical and architectural curiosity, but also a symbol of the university’s commitment to preserving its heritage and promoting biodiversity. The dovecote is also home to a colony of swifts, which are migratory birds that nest in Ireland during the summer months. The swifts are protected by law and are monitored by the university’s Swift Conservation Project, which aims to raise awareness and provide suitable nesting sites for these endangered birds.

LOCATION

53.280173, -9.061066

Dovecote At NUIG

GALLERY

REVIEWS

There are currently no reviews submitted.

SHARE WITH OTHERS
DISCOVER MORE
NEWSLETTER SIGN UP